Board games BOARD GAMES

Take The Brain

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Family chess game with a difference, released in 1970 and was to be played with 2 people. The aim of the game was to beat the brain.

This game was a simplifed chess board with seven squares across to eight deep. Each side has in effect a king (the brain), four queens and seven pawns (which become “queens” if they reach the eight rank).


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Do You Remember Take The Brain?

Do You Remember Take The Brain?

  • Anonymous user
    on
    Besudes The Brain, the pieces were Ninnies (seven of them), and Numbskulls (four of). The Ninnies were based on chess pawns, while the Numbskulls moved similar to Queens. On the other hand, the pieces could only move in the directions the arrows on their square at the start of the move, allowed. Ninnies could only move one square at a time, whereas Numbskulls could move as far on the board that the squares allowed (i.e. 7 or 8). The sides were red, or blue. I owe the game my initial interest in, and love of, chess.
  • Anonymous user
    on
    I still have this game, love it. Thought about in laying thd board into a glass coffee table to preserve itand cast the plastic figures in lead. Posh.
    • Anonymous user
      on
      Need to buy take the brain where do let source this game as I have lost my previous game
    • Anonymous user
      on
      your lucky. its amazing game. please e mail the rules to me... im going to re create it from online photos.
    • Anonymous user
      on
      Hi, Any chance of emailing me the rules, please? I have the game and wanted to play it with my g children, today..but no rules. Thanks.
      • Anonymous user
        on
        Rules For 2 Players - All Ages Object The object of the game is to capture your opponent's "BRAIN." Equipment The equipment consists of a playing board and two sets of pieces. How to play Each player takes a set of 12 pieces all of the same colour consisting of one "BRAIN," four "NUMSKULLS" and seven "NINNYS" (see pictures on playing board). Each player places his pieces on the board on the squares indicated. One player is selected to go first. Players alternate, moving one piece, and only one, on each turn. Each square has from one to four pointers printed on it. Players move out of any square only in a direction indicated by these pointers. NOTE: It is always the pointers on the space a piece starts from that determines the direction in which that piece may move. A "NINNY" can move only one space on any turn. A "NUMSKULL" is more valuable than a "NINNY." On each turn a "NUMSKULL" can move any number of squares in any direction a pointer indicates from the square it is on. It can move one square, or two, or three or more, but it must move in a straight line. It does not have to obey any pointers except the ones on the square from which it starts. A "BRAIN" moves in the same manner as a "NINNY." Players may never move any of their pieces onto or over a square occupied by another of their pieces. A player must move each time it is his turn. He may move any one of his pieces he wishes, so long as it can be moved without landing on or passing over a square occupied by one of his pieces. Capturing A player captures an opponent's piece by moving one of his own pieces onto a square occupied by an opponent's piece. Any piece can capture. Captured pieces are removed from the board and are out of play for the rest of the game. Players do not have to capture opponent's pieces unless there is no other possible move. When a player captures his opponent's "BRAIN," he is the winner and the game is over. If the only two pieces left in the game are the two "BRAINS" neither player can win and the game is a tie. If a player can move any of his "NINNY'S" onto one of his opponent's "NUMSKULL'S" starting squares, that "NINNY" becomes a "NUMSKULL." It is removed from the board and replaced with a "NUMSKULL" which had previously been captured. Strategy Try first to eliminate some of your opponent's pieces, especially his "NUMSKULLS," without losing too many of your own. Sometimes it is wise to sacrifice one of your pieces to get one of his in return. This is especially true if it opens up squares so that your "NUMSKULLS" can get into play. At times you may have to retreat in order to save a piece. You can move backwards if there is a pointer indicating that direction. Protecting your "BRAIN" Leave some pieces near your "Brain" to protect it, but also try to leave an escape route. If a "NUMSKULL" is attacking your "BRAIN" from across the board you can stop it by moving one of your pieces between it and your "BRAIN." The piece you move, in this way, should be protected by another piece or it will be captured. We will be glad to answer questions concerning this game. Parker Games Division of Palitoy Ltd., Coalville, Leicester, England.
      • Anonymous user
        on
        Rules For 2 Players - All Ages Object The object of the game is to capture your opponent's "BRAIN." Equipment The equipment consists of a playing board and two sets of pieces. How to play Each player takes a set of 12 pieces all of the same colour consisting of one "BRAIN," four "NUMSKULLS" and seven "NINNYS" (see pictures on playing board). Each player places his pieces on the board on the squares indicated. One player is selected to go first. Players alternate, moving one piece, and only one, on each turn. Each square has from one to four pointers printed on it. Players move out of any square only in a direction indicated by these pointers. NOTE: It is always the pointers on the space a piece starts from that determines the direction in which that piece may move. A "NINNY" can move only one space on any turn. A "NUMSKULL" is more valuable than a "NINNY." On each turn a "NUMSKULL" can move any number of squares in any direction a pointer indicates from the square it is on. It can move one square, or two, or three or more, but it must move in a straight line. It does not have to obey any pointers except the ones on the square from which it starts. A "BRAIN" moves in the same manner as a "NINNY." Players may never move any of their pieces onto or over a square occupied by another of their pieces. A player must move each time it is his turn. He may move any one of his pieces he wishes, so long as it can be moved without landing on or passing over a square occupied by one of his pieces. Capturing A player captures an opponent's piece by moving one of his own pieces onto a square occupied by an opponent's piece. Any piece can capture. Captured pieces are removed from the board and are out of play for the rest of the game. Players do not have to capture opponent's pieces unless there is no other possible move. When a player captures his opponent's "BRAIN," he is the winner and the game is over. If the only two pieces left in the game are the two "BRAINS" neither player can win and the game is a tie. If a player can move any of his "NINNY'S" onto one of his opponent's "NUMSKULL'S" starting squares, that "NINNY" becomes a "NUMSKULL." It is removed from the board and replaced with a "NUMSKULL" which had previously been captured. Strategy Try first to eliminate some of your opponent's pieces, especially his "NUMSKULLS," without losing too many of your own. Sometimes it is wise to sacrifice one of your pieces to get one of his in return. This is especially true if it opens up squares so that your "NUMSKULLS" can get into play. At times you may have to retreat in order to save a piece. You can move backwards if there is a pointer indicating that direction. Protecting your "BRAIN" Leave some pieces near your "Brain" to protect it, but also try to leave an escape route. If a "NUMSKULL" is attacking your "BRAIN" from across the board you can stop it by moving one of your pieces between it and your "BRAIN." The piece you move, in this way, should be protected by another piece or it will be captured. We will be glad to answer questions concerning this game. Parker Games Division of Palitoy Ltd., Coalville, Leicester, England.