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Bayko builder kits

Bayko builder kits

These sets were bricks that were laid just like the real thing with a water-soluble mortar and even 'scaffolding' that slotted into holes in the baseboard.

Bayko was invented by Charles Plimpton, a plastics engineer from Liverpool. It was originally sold in Britain and was soon sold throughout the British Commonwealth and became sold world wide from 1934 and 1967. The company was sold to Meccano in 1960 who stopped producing it in 1967.

The name derived from Bakelite, a fairly cheap commercial plastic that was originally used to manufacture many of the parts. Bayko was one of the world's earliest plastic toys and could be said to be the precursor to Lego, who only made wooden bricks until 1940.


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Bayko builder kits Last post by anubis68
29 September 2010

Do You Remember Bayko builder kits?

Do You Remember Bayko builder kits?

  • Anonymous user
    on
    Well done that roysie.....No water soluble mortar was in Bayko...I still have a super large set of Bayko in mint condition...I have loads from the "red roof and green windows era" and TONS from the later "green roof and yellow windows" era...wasn't it great ?!
  • Anonymous user
    on
    Just to make a correction. Bayko was predominately plastic mouldings with metal rods and tie bars. No water souble mortar was ever needed. However, there was another building set that was called something like Junior Bricklayer. This had tiny clay bricks that were laid on a blueprint using a flour and water type mix. Once the building had been made and 'admired' for a couple of weeks, the whole thing could be soaked in hot water for an hour and the bricks could be dismantled, washed and used again for the next project.